Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Quoting Spurgeon

I read this today and was so moved, bear in mind it was written a century ago so the English is a bit wordy for us, but the truths that are written there are undeniable.

We shall, as we ripen in grace, have greater sweetness towards our fellow Christians. Bitter-spirited Christians may know a great deal, but they are immature. Those who are quick to censure may be very acute in judgment, but they are as yet very immature in heart. He who grows in grace remembers that he is but dust, and he therefore does not expect his fellow Christians to be anything more; he overlooks ten thousand of their faults, because he knows his God overlooks twenty thousand in his own case. He does not expect perfection in the creature, and, therefore, he is not disappointed when he does not find it. As he has sometimes to say of himself, ““This is my infirmity,”” so he often says of his brethren, ““This is their infirmity;”” and he does not judge them as he once did.
I know we who are young beginners in grace think ourselves qualified to reform the whole Christian church. We drag her before us, and condemn her straightway; but when our virtues become more mature, I trust we shall not be more tolerant of evil, but we shall be more tolerant of infirmity, more hopeful for the people of God, and certainly less arrogant in our criticisms.
From a sermon by Charles Haddon Spurgeon entitled “Ripe Fruit,” delivered August 14, 1870.


Anonymous said...

priceless...wish the Church had more Spurgeons and fewer Pharisees....

Angie said...

Amen- I pray I live in freedom and not condemnation.
It's much easier to do the later.

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